Incheon airport (ICN) to
andong (station)

Do you want to know how to get to the andong (station)?
There are many ways you can get to andong (station) such as public transportation (bus, subway / metro), taxi and Blacklink limo/transfer/shuttle service.

  • Public Transportation

    bus

    Distance : 0.0km

    Time : min

    Fare : dollar0.0

  • Taxi

    taxi

    Distance : 275.909km

    Time : 3h 23min

    Fare : dollar214.7

  • Blacklink

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    Fare : dollar303.9 ~

    Price Quotearrow_white

Since most public transportations (bus, subway/metro) are not available 24/7, make sure to check the bus schedules when using late night bus. During busy hours, it is hard to find a taxi driver and the you may have to pay for extra fare for late night use. Despite of a bit higher price, Blacklink provides a hassle free and comfortable door-to-door transfer service from Incheon Airport (ICN) and Gimpo Airport (GMP) to your lodging or from your lodging to ICN and GMP.

Don't sweat outside waiting for other transportation with your luggage. Make a round trip reservation with Blacklink as you plan for your trip. It is easy, convenient and available 24/7. Then, the assigned Blacklink driver will greet you at the arrival and will drive you to the andong (station). You can use Blacklink for not only hotel but also Gimpo Airport (GMP), Myeongdong, Jongno-gu, guesthouse, resort, airbnb, lodging and anywhere you want to go in Korea. Check out Blacklink customer review posted below.

Blacklink real review

  • Feb. 18, 2020, 11 p.m.

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    comma

    The drivers did a great job. They are friendly and very helpful. Keet it up! I'll definitely recommend you. Thank you. Til our next visit to South Korea.

    comma
  • Feb. 16, 2020, 10:50 p.m.

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    comma

    Best decision we made so far. During my trips to Korea with family or friends, transport from the airport to our lodging is always the dilemna. Good thing I stumbled upon blacklink. we were able to book a service on the day of our arrival. Our driver, Mr Lee, on time. He was so helpful and very considerate. He inisisted that we go in the car where it warm and that he load our luggage in the van. He was also very patient. We mistakenly put in the wrong address on the registration as we couldnt understand Korean. He didnt drop us off the the wrong place. When that was sorted out, he brought us to our exact accomodation. He also made sure that we met with our host and got in our accomodations safe and sound. Thank you Mr Lee! Will definitely book blacklink again. it was value for our money and very convenient

    comma
  • Feb. 4, 2020, 11 p.m.

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    comma

    It was my first time to visit South Korea, and was a bit worried about our transfers from Incheon International Airport to our hotel in Myeongdong as the schedule of our flight will arrive at SoKor quite late. No buses or trains available anymore during that time. Tried checking ride hailing apps but find it too expensive while deals from other travel booking sites but there were a lot of restrictions and add-ons. Good thing I came across Blacklink when I tried searching online. To be honest I was a bit hesitant since it is my first time to use the platform. Apparently, I was immediately relieved because they send email updates from time to time (payment confirmation, assigned driver and vehicle, etc). When we arrived, the driver is patiently waiting for us and assisted us with our luggages politely and willingly. With this, I also booked a vehicle through the platform for our transfer from the hotel to the airport. Will definitely use Blacklink again whenever I go back to South Korea. Great Job! So happy with the service. Plus, it's very efficient and convenient especially if you travel by group. -Carmina, Philippines

    comma
  • Jan. 15, 2020, 1:30 p.m.

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    comma

    Wonderful drivers. Thank you so much for your services. It made it so much relaxing having your drivers picking us up from our house to airport and airport to house. Will use you guys again.

    comma
  • Jan. 9, 2020, 5:20 p.m.

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    comma

    Easy to talk too through whatsapp and very accommodating when it comes to requests.

    comma

andong (station) information

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andong (station)

markerAndong Office

Andong is a city in South Korea, and the capital of North Gyeongsang Province. It is the largest city in the northern part of the province with a population of 167,821 as of October 2010. The Nakdong River flows through the city. Andong is a market centre for the surrounding agricultural areas. Andong has famous local foods that originated in the city such as heotjesabap, Andong jjimdak, Andong soju (a rice wine), Andong sikhye (a punch), Geonjin guksu (a noodle dish), and salted mackerel. Heotjesabap is a variety of bibimbap, served with soy sauce (ganjang) instead of the gochujang (hot pepper paste) that is more commonly used. Heotjesa bab consists mainly of several types of namul (young sprouted vegetables) over white rice. It is also served with grilled fish, shark, and jeon (Korean pancake). The dish originated in Andong. The term, Heotjesa bap literally means "dishes for fake jesa" that are ceremonies for death anniversary and ancestor veneration held in Korea. The reason it is considered fake is that it is not covered in incense ash, as would happen to any food sacrificed in a jesa ritual. Andong jjimdak is a variety of jjim (a Korean steamed or braised dish), made with chicken, cellophane noodles, and various vegetables marinated in a ganjang (Korean soy sauce) based sauce. The name literally means "steamed chicken of Andong." There are many speculations on the origins of the dish. One is that the it is a specialty food of the inner rich village of Andong during the Joseon period, prepared and eaten for special occasions. The more likely explanation is that during the 1980s in the Dak golmok (닭골목, literally "chicken alley") of the "Andong Old Market," restaurant owners there made a dish including ingredients that regulars demanded, which became the current Andong jjimdak. Restaurateurs in the area claim it was invented by five local old women who had limited chicken supplies and wanted to stretch it out.[6] The most plausible speculation among existing assumptions is that merchants of the Dak golmok at the market created the dish to keep their position against the rapid expansion of Western fried chicken shops. Andong Soju is a specialty of the region. It is made with natural ingredients, unlike mass-produced brands, it was historically used for medicinal purposes, and was developed during the Silla dynasty. The traditions of Andong Soju were almost lost during the '60s and '70s due to government legislation, but they were brought back by Cho Ok-hwa, the current skillholder. Andong soju was traditionally made by the wife of a household, and she passed down the secrets to her daughters-in-law. Mackerel is another popular local delicacy. Caught downstream where the Nakdong River meets the sea, in ancient times the fish would spoil before being brought further inland. Using special salting techniques, Andong was the furthest inland the fish could be brought, so aristocrats would travel to Andong specially for the salted fish. Sikhye is a fermented rice punch served across Korea. The Andong variety, however, is particularly spicy, made with powdered red pepper, ginger, and radish. Sikhye contains lactobacillus, a benign strain of bacteria found in the gastrointestinal tract, and often used as a digestive aid in dishes including kimchi, yogurt, and sauerkraut, among others.